We’ve often mentioned how we work, enjoying the spontaneous progression of our compositions, watching the imagery appear like a photo being developed in a darkroom. We’ve also reflected on how in the fall we’re especially sensitive to the mood and colors of the season. Reacting to so much change, it’d be nice if we could somehow capture each vivid moment.

 

We’ve been asked many times if we take photos of our fiber ‘paintings’ while working through our process.

 

Having been asked many times if we take photos of our fiber ‘paintings’ while working through our process, we’ve tried to record the visual storyline with every layer we add. But after the sixth or seventh pass, we have a tendency to forget to snap the shutter. Maybe it’s because the work of creating the painting often transports us, causing us to forget about our present lives in the studio. Or maybe it has something to do with time.

When we started this piece, it was still summer and the work reflected it. That season was the composition that voluntarily developed after the first few layers of primary colors were applied. August was warm and sunny, and our painting was reflecting it through the calming flow of rolling hills of emerald hues. But with layers of fabric and stitching applied on top of more fabric and stitching, the piece started to change – just like the season. And, as usual, we forgot to photograph its development.

 

..with layers of fabric and stitching applied on top of more fabric and stitching, the piece started to change – just like the season

 

So now we find ourselves in the midst of Autumn. Lisa started turning the rolling hills into a mountain range. Lori added a stream coursing its blue path through a meadow. Lisa began dappling the foothills with the colors of golden leaves. The next layer brought the contrasts of blazing yellows and oranges against the sage greens along with the blues of a cooler sky. As every week went by, another complement of colors were exposed by the passing of time, and we felt obliged to capture them. In our fiber painting, just like in the natural world, there are layers of mood, feeling, and expression compounding in response to time. It is our privilege and honor to bear witness and catch these incredible moments of life.

 

The back of the Lubbesmeyer fiber painting "Mountain Meadow in Autumn"

 

The back of Mountain Meadow at its finish. This is the bobbin thread accumulated from the many layers of over-stitching. Until we successfully capture each layer of our process, you’ll find this a welcome alternative view.

Hopefully you find this is the next best thing to showing each layer through our process?

 

 

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