It’s December already, and we have to admit, we’re caught a bit off guard. If it hadn’t been for the abrupt weather change, we’d think we’d still have some warm summer months to enjoy. We spend so much time in our studio it’s easy to pass a number of days before realizing another week (or month) has ended. When engrossed in our work of making art, we tend to rely on circadian rhythms as much as our imaginations for what to do next. We have a couple of pieces that are perfect examples of this.

 

we tend to rely on circadian rhythms as much as our imaginations for what to do next

 

We started both of these pieces in the summer. The fiber ‘paintings’ began as they always do, each with one layer of fabric stitched onto their muslin ‘canvas’ backings. Then we traded. Making this exchange about five or six times, each time adding a few more color blocks, stitching and then passing them, establishing what appeared to be the architecture of tree groves. Interestingly, one felt like an aspen grove, the other looked very much like a high desert view with juniper trees. Both of them began with palettes of warm summer colors. Time passed, the work passed, and before we knew it we worked through fall and are now into winter. As if to keep us aware of the changes happening around us, the juniper changed to a grove of quaking aspen with its leaves blowing in an autumn wind. And the piece that started as a summer aspen grove dropped its leaves and became a winter scene with snow drifts, bare trees and snowflakes fluttering through the sky.

Lubbesmeyer Fluttering Snow fiber painting

Flurry, Fiber with overstitching, 22 x 22″ framed, click here to view this and other available art.

Each of these visual transformations represents what comes to pass in our day-to-day lives. We work in earnest, but we often feel like we’re just along for the ride. Yes, we’re responsible for the creation of these fiber ‘paintings’, but most of the time we feel like we’re on journeys, traveling through unfamiliar lands. We don’t know what is around the corner, or what’s beyond the horizon. And we keep working with open minds, ready to welcome whatever reveals itself.

 

Each of these visual transformations represents what comes to pass in our day-to-day lives.

 

We have many things we feel fortunate for in being able to do our work. One of them is what we see in the finished work. We can see the ‘visual dialogue’ beneath the many layers and all the time that passed while having it. There aren’t any shortcuts. We feel every bump, we savor every blue sky, and wonder about every expansive vista. Even though we lose track of time when immersed in our work, we’re thankful we can see that time hasn’t passed us by.

Quaking Aspen is a 'fiber painting' created by twin artists, Lisa and Lori Lubbesmeyer.

Quaking Aspen, Fiber with overstitching, 26.5 x 38.5″ framed, click here to view this and other available art.

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