When we were young we spent a lot of time outdoors. We often heard our Mom’s order, “Go outside if you’re bored!” With our parents’ love and trust of the outdoors we were allowed to roam the open spaces surrounding our home from sunrise to sunset. We spent countless hours creating imaginary places and different ways to get to them. One of our favorite adventures was to saddle up our wood rail fence as if it was a line of horses, and ‘ride’ single file over a make believe trail through open ranges and hills of undiscovered territories.

 

“Go outside if you’re bored!”

 

For all the hours spent pretending to explore the wilderness, there was one particular day of imaginary riding that linked our invented world with reality. We were about 5 and it was an unusually warm spring day. After breakfast, we packed lunches and ran outside to resume our adventures. We used our blankets as saddles, loaded up our make shift saddlebags with our provisions, and galloped the fence horses for what felt like hours. We enjoyed the destination of our ride by stretching out in the grass of an unfamiliar meadow (which was the lawn of our back yard). We were lying on our sides, a few feet apart and facing each other. What we found ourselves doing while there, was noticing how many of the blades of grass standing between us were moving. They were bending in many different directions. Focusing in closer, we saw dozens, if not hundreds of ants, beetles and other little bugs making their way through and over the grass. There were also butterflies and ladybugs hovering and landing within our little section of the plain. We watched them for a while and then began making up stories about where the bugs were going, who were their families, and what they were going to eat for dinner. We remember this so vividly because in that moment we came to realize, regardless of what kind of creatures we are, we’re all doing and needing the same things. Later, we also became acutely aware of how we affect one another when we were called for dinner and had to walk across the lawn.

 

 Regardless of what kind of creatures we are, we’re all doing and needing the same things.

 

As artists, when we began working together and returned to the joy of sharing our twin imaginations, what emerged in our work was a depth of color, movement, and light that was unlike our individual work. It was an immediate and subconscious shift from the dark, brooding art we created when we were working separately. Now, as adults, we have the benefit of retrospection. We like to think about that day when we discovered the existence of an entire world living outside our imaginations. We like to consider all the conditions of that moment which joined to bring us to this current time in our lives. Naturally, as well as with intention, we strive to bring harmony to each other, our work, and hopefully, to you. Our ecosystem.

 

We strive to bring harmony to each other, our work, and hopefully, to you. Our ecosystem.

 

Lubbesmeyer Sunbathed Hills Fiber Art

 

Sunbathed Hills, 2016, Fiber with overstitching, 34 x 34” framed.
This piece and other fiber art ‘painting’s are available on our website.

 

 

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